Vitamin C – Safest and most effective Nutrient

Vitamin C

Vitamin C is also called L – Ascorbic Acid or simply Ascorbate, it has a biological role as a reducing agent in hydroxylation reactions in the body. Because of its widespread use as a dietary supplement, vitamin C may be more familiar to the general public than any other nutrient. Vitamin C is one of the safest and most effective nutrients. It is needed by the body to form collagen in bones, cartilage, muscle, and blood. Approximately 70%–90% of vitamin C is absorbed at moderate intakes of 30–180 mg/day. However, at doses above 1 g/day, absorption falls to less than 50% and absorbed, unmetabolized ascorbic acid is excreted in the urine

Health Benefits of Vitamin C.

  1. Vitamin C is involved in the biosynthesis of collagen, L-carnitine, and certain neurotransmitters. Collagen is an essential component of connective tissue, which plays a vital role in wound healing.
  2. Vitamin C is also involved in protein metabolism
  3. Vitamin C is also an important physiological antioxidant and has been shown to regenerate other antioxidants within the body, including alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E)
  4. Vitamin C plays an important role in immune function
  5. Improves the absorption of nonheme iron, the form of iron present in plant based foods.

Recommended Dietary Allowances for Vitamin C

Age

Male

Female

Pregnancy

Lactation
0–6 months

40 mg*

40 mg*

7–12 months

50 mg*

50 mg*

1–3 years

15 mg

15 mg

4–8 years

25 mg

25 mg

9–13 years

45 mg

45 mg

14–18 years

75 mg

65 mg

80 mg

115 mg

19+ years

90 mg

75 mg

85 mg

120 mg

Best Sources of Vitamin C

Fruits and vegetables are the best sources of vitamin C. Good food sources of Vitamin C include red and green peppers, oranges, kiwifruit, broccoli, strawberries, Brussels sprouts, and cantaloupe. The Daily Value (DV) for vitamin C is 60 mg for adults and children aged 4 and older.

Selected Food Sources of Vitamin C

Food Milligrams (mg) per serving Percent (%) DV*
Red pepper, sweet, raw, ½ cup

95

158

Orange juice, ¾ cup

93

155

Orange, 1 medium

70

117

Grapefruit juice, ¾ cup

70

117

Kiwifruit, 1 medium

64

107

Green pepper, sweet, raw, ½ cup

60

100

Broccoli, cooked, ½ cup

51

85

Strawberries, fresh, sliced, ½ cup

49

82

Brussels sprouts, cooked, ½ cup

48

80

Grapefruit, ½ medium

39

65

Broccoli, raw, ½ cup

39

65

Tomato juice, ¾ cup

33

55

Cantaloupe, ½ cup

29

48

Cabbage, cooked, ½ cup

28

47

Cauliflower, raw, ½ cup

26

43

*DV = Daily Value. Foods providing 20% or more of the DV are considered to be high sources of a nutrient.

  1. Apricots – Source of Vitamin A and Vitamin C (healthinessbox.com)
  2. Avoid  a Heart Attack (healthinessbox.com)
  3. Carrots – The Poor Mans Ginseng (healthinessbox.com)
  4. Daily Requirement of Vitamins, Minerals and Calories (healthinessbox.com)
  5. Drink Warm Water (healthinessbox.com)
  6. Flaxseeds (Linseed) – A good source of Omega-3 essential fatty acids (healthinessbox.com)
  7. Ginseng – increases mental and physical performance (healthinessbox.com)
  8. Grapefruit – A Recipe for Good Health (healthinessbox.com)
  9. Vitamin A – Helps your eyes (healthinessbox.com)
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