Prostate Enlargement or Benign Hrostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

What is Prostate Gland?

enlarged-prostate
Enlarged Prostate

The Prostate Gland surrounds the urethra, which is the tube that carries urine from the bladder out through the tip of the penis. As the prostate grows larger, it may press on the urethra. This narrowing of the urethra can cause some men with prostate enlargement to have trouble with urination. This Benign prostatic hypertrophy, or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), occurs when the cells of the prostate gland begin to multiply. Prostate enlargement may be the most common health problem in men older than 60 years of age.

What does it mean if you have an enlarged prostate?

An enlarged prostate means the gland has grown bigger than its normal size.

What is the size of Prostate Gland?

The prostate gland, which is normally about the size and shape of a walnut, wraps around the urethra between the pubic bone and the rectum, below the bladder. As men age, and under the influence of male hormones the prostate can grow to many times its normal size. In some men, it may become as large as a grapefruit.

What is enlarged Prostate Gland?

In the early stage of prostate enlargement, the bladder muscle becomes thicker and forces urine through the narrowed urethra by contracting more powerfully. As a result, the bladder muscle may become more sensitive, causing a need to urinate more often and more. As the prostate grows larger and the urethra is squeezed more tightly, the bladder might not be able to fully compensate for the problem and completely empty. In some cases, blockage from prostate enlargement may cause repeated urinary tract infections and gradually result in bladder or kidney damage. It may also cause a sudden inability to urinate(acute urinary retention) that is a medical emergency.

What are the Causes of Prostate Enlargement?

The prostate grows larger due to an increase in the number of cells (hyperplasia). However, the precise reason for this increase is unknown. A variety of factors may be involved, including androgens (male hormones), estrogens, growth factors and other cell signaling pathways.

Symptoms of Prostrate Enlargement

Less than half of all men with BPH have symptoms of the disease. Symptoms may include:-

  • Dribbling at the end of urinating
  • Inability to urinate (urinary retention)
  • Incomplete emptying of your bladder
  • Incontinence
  • Needing to urinate 2 or more times per night
  • Pain with urination or bloody urine (these may indicate infection)
  • Slowed or delayed start of the urinary stream
  • Straining to urinate
  • Strong and sudden urge to urinate
  • Weak urine stream

Tests and Exams for Prostate Enlargement

Doctor will check medical history and do a digital rectal exam to feel the prostate gland. Other tests you may have include:

  • Urine flow rate
  • Post-void residual urine test to see how much urine is left in your bladder after you urinate
  • Pressure-flow studies to measure the pressure in the bladder as you urinate
  • Urinalysis to check for blood or infection
  • Urine culture to check for infection
  • Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test to screen for prostate cancer
  • Cystoscopy

Treatment Prostate Enlargement.

The treatment you choose will be based on how bad your symptoms are and how much they bother you. Your provider will also take into account other medical problems you may have. Treatment options include “watchful waiting,” lifestyle changes, medicines, or surgery.

If you are over 60, you are more likely to have symptoms. But many men with an enlarged prostate have only minor symptoms. Self-care steps are often enough to make you feel better.

Self Care during Prostrate Enlargement.

These steps may help you manage mild symptoms:

  1. Do pelvic-strengthening exercises.
  2. Stay active.
  3. Decrease alcohol and caffeine intake.
  4. Space out how much you drink rather than drinking a lot at once.
  5. Urinate when the urge strikes — don’t wait.
  6. Avoid decongestants and antihistamines.

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